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all of the time. david asbin with forbes >>> it's back. are you ready to pay up more for government-run health care? a group of democratic leaders are raising the stakes and pushing for a public option. this is congresswoman jan chikowski. >> it would decrease the deaf faucet $104 billion over 10 years. >> of course not everybody agrees that government health insurance would save money. republican critics oppose the government takeover of health care saying it is too costly and could bank rupt the country. who is right? welcome to "forbes on fox." let's go in focus. mike, you say we just can't afford a full-ploan -- full-blown national health care system. >> no, we can't. anyone who has tried it has experienced higher costs or less health care. we can see with obamacare that is a backdoor into a single payer system he had to implement a huge tax increase to pay for it. of course it costs more. >> the president was telling us this is what he has planned. obamacare is not a single payer plan which is national health care. but isn't that in fact what it is turning into? >> well, i thin
to fight terrorism and stand with the algerian government, who have paid a heavy price over many years fighting against a savage terrorist campaign. this is a continuing situation. we will do our best to keep parliament and the public updated. we hope this will reach a conclusion shortly. there will be a moment to learn the necessary lessons. i commend this statement to the house. >> that was the british prime minister speaking about the hostage crisis in algeria with 34 workers and gas facility killed. lauren joins us from outside the house of commons. what has david cameron been saying? >> the most significant thing is he has given a detailed explanation of the understanding of the course of the events from the point of view of britain and every other country that has citizens in their. the fact he said in parliament means this is what they have been told and they believe this is true. the most significant thing was that he said openly he had asked the algerian government to be told before they went in what was going to happen, but they were not told. he was told while the operation
, or anywhere else. >> in october, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton was in algeria urging the government to crack down on fighters who had taken control of large parts of of mali. attacks on oil and gas facilities are commonplace in other countries like nigeria where fighters are angry over foreign companies influence over production and want a bigger share the wealth. no similar reason has been given in this hostage crisis yet. >> as you heard, the algerian anterior ministry say, former commander for al qaeda in a migrant is responsible for this. he decided to form his own group. he is called the one-eyed. and he's been called un catchable, by the french. an expert says groups use al qaeda to strengthen their international profiles. >> al qaeda in the maghreb is a new phenomenon, especially in algeria. it stems back to the early 1990's when the islamic salvation islamicwon the majority of seats in the first round of the 1991 legislative election. the second round was cancelled with the expectation they would have won a majority. a splinter group needed outside support. that's when it an
the government might further tax a high tax payers in wales? >> government is considering their recommendation of the report and we would be reported by those very shortly. that will be the appropriate time. >> we all know that millionaires spend -- [inaudible] can he tell us dummy millionaires are in wales? >> he knows as well as i do the road, few millionaires in wales. but what i can tell him is that in every year this parliament they will be paying more tax than they did in each year of the last labour government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. but isn't the real danger that with a government changes in tax and benefits in wales, you will see in particular in the community with the vast majority of people work of those people will have less money in their pockets? they will have less money to spend in local shops? there will be more shops closing. there will be fewer people in jobs and it will be a double whammy for the welsh economy? >> if he wants to be taken seriously with having a mess about deficit reduction, he knows you cannot begin to to deficit reduction until you take a serious appro
interruption to their national insurance contributions. after 13 years when the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the announcement this week of a single tear pension will finally deal with this great injustice? >> i think my honorable friend makes an important way. i think the single. pension is an excellent for. i think will have all parties support because it holds out the prospect in 2017 of having a basic state pension over 140 pounds rather than 107 pounds, taking millions of people out of the main set, giving them dignity in retirement, and particularly as he says, helping low-paid people suffer what people, and above all women who have not been able to necessarily a full pension and pass. i hope will have the support of everyone across the house. >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, kind of join the prime minister in paying tribute to sapper richard walker, 20 engineer regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and all of us have thoughts with his family and friends. i also joined the prime minister i
. twin blasts rocked the school, killing at least 80 people. rebel forces as the government bombed the campus deliberately. from neighboring turkey, james reynolds reports. >> the university of aleppo was thought to be one of the last safe places in syria of's largest city. but two explosions changed that. these pictures were filmed just after the blasts. the side of this building was blown away. the university was home to both students and ordinary people who had taken refuge from fighting elsewhere in aleppo. the browns are in an area of grounds nt control -- brow are in an area under government control, but activists say it was the government to fired. >> this is the signal of the government. >> the government denies this. it says that the explosions were carried out by terrorists. it has been almost two years of fighting in syria. aleppo has been the scene of intense conflicts between the government and rebels. neither have been able to force the other to retreat for good. no corner of the city is safe. james reynolds, bbc news, is double. -- istanbul. >> lance armstrong has al
on rebels from the north. the government extended the state of emergency for three months as it waits for support from african troops in what could be a long conflict. there is a warning that the situation is likely to get much worse. more on that in a moment. jackie reports from monaco. >> the town -- from mali. >> after a week of heavy fighting, the rebels cleared on sunday, leaving the way for troops to take the town. >> i look all around us. we must search and search some more. there may be still a few pockets of indian resistance. >> theophylline fell into it -- theopoli fell into rebel hands. french troops were fulfilling the goals set by their president. >> our objective was to stop the terrorist offensive. malianto allow bucknthye army to win back, and they would allow it to get back territorial integrity. we know that will take more time. >> those african troops have been arriving slowly over the past few days. at the moment they can be counted in the hundreds, but they aim is to have several thousand to take over ground operations from the french. >> everyone is in agreement
their individual wealth and privileges to cooperate fully with the confederate government struggling to protect the interests of slave owners as a whole. and those are aspects of the book that i'm discussing with you today. but this evening i'd like to talk to you about the most important fissure that ran through the house of dixie, slavery, and the three ways slavery figured in the origin and the progress of the o civil war. first of all, the war's central cause. secondly, as a crucial source of military power deployed during that war. and, third, slavery's erosion during the war and its destruction both of those things as an eventual union goal. the destruction of slavery as an eventual conscious, deliberate union goal. so let's start with cause. as you may know, in a recent national survey half of all those people, half of all those americans when were polled deny that slavery was the main cause of the u.s. civil war. and that view is apparently gaining ground, not losing ground. because among younger people polled, those below 30 years of age, fully three out of five denied slavery's centra
,000 people lost their lives in a civil war between islamists and the authoritarian regime. the government declared victory in 2002, the low-level fighting has continued. the violence was triggered by the first democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the govern
,000 people lost thr lives in a civil war between islamists and the authoritarian regime. the government declared victory in 2002, the low-level fighting has continued. the violence was triggered by the first democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the govern
meeting had ministers from both governments working on, proposals to deepen the economic and military union. >> she says the proposals are about a deeper cooperation in economic policy with the goal a social security, employment, nd financials. >> the spirit of cooperation was exactly what the treaty of friendship was all about. >> here is a look back. >> the idyllic village near the border region has a special place in european history. and is the birthplace of the franco-german friendship. after two world wars, if you believe such a thing was possible. the unthinkable did happen. they did not have much in common. both catholic and a conservative. >> what was surprising is that the first contact in 1958 did not take place in the palace but at his private the state in a comfortable family surroundings. they spent the whole weekend of their. he treated him like a guest of the family. he did not stay in a hotel. >> he was the only politician to have been given that privilege. any mistrust between the two men evaporated. >> their relationship led to the declaration of a musical about. th
, that is an offshoot of an army that fought the government of algeria for 10 years, until 22, when they were defeated. an offshoot went down into mali with 15 european hostages, and the ransom to them for $5 million, and they remained in that area and grew stronger, and as they grow stronger, they took more hostages, and eventually, they perhaps had as many as $90 million in ransom from western countries. >> how strong is this group right now? are they much stronger than previously thought? when you look at what is happening in algeria and also the french intervention in mali, the othernot forget situations. how has that exacerbated the situation? >> all of the weapons that were not under control, the rebels were fighting the government. they slowed down into the south, where the group was in control of the smuggling route and also had money to buy them from their hostage-taking. but this is much more serious than i think many countries and the african countries as well fought. they knew that arms had come down. they knew they had come back from libya, but the capacity for planning, the breadth of th
involving in libya, there has been a lack of government control and a huge swath of the region. an explosion of uncontrolled weapons and to some of these groups, we see this in algeria and it should be seen by one campaign from the french fighting to what is going on in algeria. we have had many laws of unintended consequences and the middle east. think of the effort to get the soviets out of afghanistan and what it led to. this is a characteristic of the region, not a characteristic of bad politics. it was good to get rid of gaddafi and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready >> are they the same it. ideologically as al qaeda in iraq? >> there are experts that can talk about that. by and large what they represent is extreme for the political islamic theological movements including using violence with anybody that disagree with them. that is what is in common for all of these organizations. calling them al qaeda is loose association. a few years earlier, they invited the city terrorists in iraq to join them as well. so you get
fascism, socialism is where the government owns the means of production, in fascism the government doesn't own the means of production, but they control it and that's what's happening with our health care program. mackie says he regrets using the word fascism and clarified on fox and friends. >> mostly i was trying to describe obamacare, free enterprise capitalism which allows value tri exchange between businesses and individuals and it's the basis for prosperity in america, and allows innovation, creativity, freedom of choice. we're moving away from that, so, trying to let people see that that's probably not going to be as effective as if capitalism itself was allowed to work in the marketplace. stuart: that's interesting, government controlled health care. let's bring in da doctor, a specialist, as i said, you're a specialist, okay? under obamacare, what hoops do patients have to jump through to get to see you, a specialist? >> it's a very good question, stuart and there are huge concerns and issues in the medical community for doctors, both about themselves and also, about how to care
with heavy guns, and with hostages. it was a bloody scene. the algerian government says that 11 militants were killed, apparently the last militants there, but also, the seven foreign hostages were killed. now, the reuters news agency quoting a security source says that 16 foreign hostages were freed today and included in that number, two americans. but as we've noted it's not yet confirmed by washington, and or for that matter, picked up by other media agencies. one american has died in this four-day long saga, the texan who died of a heart attack, at least five others were free. all told, throughout this whole thing, dozens of foreign hostages have died and as well as dozens of hostages. secretary of defense leon panetta was in london today and he had some very strong words for those responsible for this attack. >> cannot accept attacks against our citizens and our interests abroad. neither can we accept an al-qaeda safe haven anywhere in the world. . >> reporter: and panetta was asked about the algerian forces tactics throughout this and criticized by various countries, a bit heavy-ha
of the individual and the power of the state. at the time that you're talking about in 1787, the government had muskets and individuals had muskets, there was a very close correlation between the power to use violence on both sides. the other thing that you have to take into account, this is something i haven't heard in this debate, and that is if you look basically to the middle of the 19th century, 1862, the winchester henry rifle, report on that rifle that i just cited in a recent paper showed that it fired 15 rounds in less than ten seconds. the fact of the matter is that repeating technology is 150 years old. and one of the worries here, i think, for people who are on the other side of this is that when we go through this bad gun analysis that there's not really a solid boundary between the current category of assault weapons, parcularly rifles, and any other gun that is out there. >> why ban machine guns then? >> machine guns were banned in 1934 as a result of the national firearms act. >> why not ban the ar-15? >> i think you can make a coherent distinks between semi-automatic firing and
straight quarters of slow growth. >>> the british government says there's no indication that the hostage crisis is over in algeria as the reports emerge that doesz may have been killed in a rescue operation. >>> investors are unnerved by big spending plans in 2013. plus, glencore pushes back its mega merger by weeks as the regulatory commission begin necessary south africa. >>> welcome to the program. i want to bring you some breaking news in terms of energy prices. the iea is out with its latest 2013 oil report. it expects u.s. oil demand to remain flat on the year. but the headline here does appear that the market, according to the iea language here, is tighter than we thought. all of a sudden, the market looks tighter than we thought. that's the main message we're getting from the organization. it says the world forecast to consume about 90.8 million barrels per day in 2013, up by about a quarter of a million since december. despite seeing the u.s. slight to even negative, seen as driving increase in demand and global supplies felly 170,000 barrels per day in december to 192 million.
, it was very different from the way he, you know, governed for the last four years or attempted to govern. he came at it from sort of a centrist, pragmatist approach, and it didn't work out so well for him a lot of the times. he faced a congress in republican hands for the last two years in the house that did not, you know, accept his agenda or pass it through the way he would like it. so i think he learned from this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some
found, the government warns there are more credible threats of kidnapping attempts. they had a lot of this information is fluid. conor powell joins us live. >> reporter: hundreds of hostages have been freed, but according to a algerian officia, they've spent the day sifting through the debris and bodies of those not as fortunate. according to a private private television station in algeria. the authorities at the gas plant found dozens of bodies, last count 25 that have been identified and found in that facility, but making it difficult to actually identify who they are is from the problem that they're so badly damaged, they can't tell if they were hostages or members of the islam i can militant terrorists that overtook and attacked that building. also making things difficult, there are reports of booby traps and mines and bombs all over the facility, so identifying and rescuing and pulling these bodies out so they can be shipped back to their home countries is going very, very slow because of awful these sort of other problems. now, algeria's government said in total, 32 islamic m
. these are composed of experts on terrorism across government agencies and make recommendations to the deputies who assist the president's cabinet in formulating a response to crises involving terrorism. there was an attempt from the outset it seems by officials at the state department and elsewhere to downplay this as a terrorist attack against americans and it's not clear why, because these teams, and the fast team of marines from rota, spain were not sent to benghazi. as a result the f.b.i. could not enter the benghazi consulate for 24 days. that prevented them from doing crucial work on the ground in benghazi that would have helped them get to the bottom of who was responsible for this attack. >> reporter: what remaining questions do you have about the conclusions of the accountability review board, that is a committee headed by admiral mike mullen and former ambassador thomas pickering about mistakes made in benghazi. >> reporter: wong of the recommendone of the questions we have is they say they interviewed 100 witnesses and officials who were involved that night in the benghazi response, but
. [ laughter ] folks, but down in the bunker, i'm ready for that dark tomorrow when jack-booted government thugs come for our guns. that's where the ghillie suit comes in. let's say the government busts in here looking to arrest me because i'm a gun owner and haul me off to one of those jails where you can't bring your gun. [ laughter ] oh, they have 'em. they already have them set up, okay? the minute they bust down that door, i just do this. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] "hey, where's colbert? >> he's not here. just a pile of grass clippings on his desk. perfectly normal. and i'm home free. you're going to want to get one of these, and not just because it's slimming. [ laughter ] no, tomorrow is the day reich marshal von amtrak has promised to issue his recommendations for gun control. >> i'm going to be submitting to the president a proposal as to how to proceed. i'm shooting for tuesday. we all know there's no silver bullet. >> stephen: you hear that? [ laughter ] they're taking away our silver bullets. how will we defend ourselves from werewolf bandits?! [ laughter ] so with our
syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push to rally support for sweeping plan to address gun violence. on thursday, vice-president joe biden called for action before hundreds of u.s. mayors gathered in washington, d.c. foreign annual meeting. in his address, biden referenced the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut that claimed the lives of 20 children, six school staff, and the shooter's mother. >> we have to do something. i hope we all agree there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot continue to be tolerated. that tragedy in all my years of public life i think is -- has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. >> a new poll affirms vice president joe biden's claim about the impact of new town, finding it affected the public opinion on guns or deeply than other shootings. a new poll says 54% of americans believe gun co
all handgunes, and there was a buy-back program where you could hand them in and the government could compensate you for it and after an extended period of time it was illegal to own these. the problem with america you couldn't do that. there are 300 million guns in circulation. and i don't think any american under the right to bear arms amendment in the constitution, any conif you confiscatn. in california they got 2,000 handed in, in one day. it was a start. people were handing in rocket launchers, charlie, in los angeles. you know, i look at britain. i look at australia. i looked at the reaction that happened to those massacres there, and it was very different to here. it wasn't awe political issue. it wasn't 11 and right. the australian prime minister, john howard, wrote in the "new york times," fascinating piece about -- >> rose: what he did. >> he was considered pretty far right conservative, but he brought in really draconian gun control, and as he pointed out,ain massacres per the port arthur massacre which was a tipping point in the previous 10 or 12 years, i think it was. an
throughout the day and we have been struggling to chase this down and get the details. the u.s. government says it is taking the lead on the hostage situation. what is it doing tonight to make sure that the americans being held hostage are safe. >> the first thing they gave was to get satellite surveillance over that area which means that the fbi can now monitor to some extent what is happening on the ground. the next thing that the u.s. military did was upgrade the readiness status of the so-called commanders and extremists force. this is the small, lethal counter terrorism force that u.s. africa command did not have when the consulal ate was attacked. it allows command to be ready to go and have a team dedicated to hostage rescue and counter terrorism. this team we are told was already on its way to be in place for any potential missions that might come up. they have been diverted. they are in an undisclosed location. the defense official says with the number of potential hostage takers it would be an extremely dangerous assault mission. they are hoping there is some sort of diplomatic s
by the minute. the white house now saying it is in constant contact with the algerian government. we're getting brand new video showing groups of hostages finally free what is described as a horrifying ordeal. there are reports of hostages with explosives strapped to their chest as others were executed. the algerian state news agency is reporting that at least 32 hostages remain unaccounted for at that natural gas plant where this all began following a raid by algerian forces. it is unclear at this time how many americans are still held. our defense secretary, leon panetta, addressed the crisis a short time ago. >> terrorists should be on notice that they will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. jenna: the defense secretary speaking in london there. terrorists affiliated with al qaeda are holed up at that gas plant. they have been there now for three days, demanding an end to the anti-terror campaign playing out right now in neighboring mali. that big area of north africa is part of what we're seeing with this rise of al qaeda in that continent. chie
at the state level that we can look to, the federal government needs to look at and see, those are things that actually could prevent some of this gun violence. let's make the crimes harsher, let's federalize some of the penalties for using a gun to commit a crime. >> all right. i just -- i find it ironic that people who want spending cuts are proposing more spending. that's a separate issue. john, let me ask you about this that i referenced in texas. they are now saying there's a law being considered, a bill in texas, where if you're already allowed to carry concealed hand gun, you would now be allowed to carry that concealed hand gun on a college or university campus. is that bill going to change because of what happened today or is it just going to go full ahead? >> let's hope so. if there's some common sense and decency on the part of the legislators to respond to changing facts on the ground. look, this shooting is a case study for why more guns on college campuses are a terrible idea. i mean, it doesn't pass the common sense test. anyone who has been to college, it's hard to imagine
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)

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